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Asperger's Syndrome: A Guide for Parents and Professionals is a book authored by Dr. Tony Attwood. The book, first released in 1998, will assist parents and professionals with the identification, treatment and care of both children and adults with Asperger syndrome.[1] Although this book is titled Asperger's it is still very relevant to the autism spectrum and many children who are diagnosed with this every day.[2]

Structure

The book is divided into eight chapters as noted below[3]:

  • Chapter 1 - Diagnosis
  • Chapter 2 - Social Behavior
  • Chapter 3 - Language and Routine
  • Chapter 4 - Interest and Routine
  • Chapter 5 - Motor Clumsiness
  • Chapter 6 - Cognition
  • Chapter 7 - Sensory Sensitivity
  • Chapter 8 - Frequently Asked Questions

Attwood has presented the materials in a way that enables the reader to view the world "through the eyes of a person with Asperger Syndrome". At the end of each chapter, practical strategies are presented to reduce the characteristics of Asperger Syndrome. Three useful Appendixes appear at the end of the book:

  1. Appendix I Resource Material on Emotions and Friendship
  2. How Do You Feel Today
  3. Diagnostic Criteria

Sections on References, Subject Index, and Author Index complete the book.

Reviews

  • Michael Jones; "Reading this book was an unexpectedly emotional experience for me. I checked it out from the library because my wife and I recently have begun to strongly suspect that although he has not been diagnosed and although he functions reasonably well in social situations, my son most likely is an Asperger's syndrome sufferer. As I read the book, I certainly saw my son in the pages, but I was not prepared for who else I saw there: myself."[4]
  • Kathie Hatch; "Excellent book for teachers and parents. Very comprehensive and interesting. It will help me a lot with my Aspie students (as Tony Attwood would say). LOVE THEM."[5]
  • Sarah Hamilton; "Essential reading for anyone with an autistic family member or who thinks they have some traits themselves."[6]

References

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